Insights

Amazon’s 70+ Private Label Brands

70-plus-private-labels-green

We’ve been watching Amazon’s private label growth for some time, and frequently advise established brands on how to rise above the influx of low-cost product offerings. Last December, L2 Inc published a list of 41 brands associated with Amazon, but this week that number has skyrocketed to over 70 private label brands, thanks to research by Recode and L2.
 

Here’s the full list:

Clothing, Shoes & Jewelry

206 Collective
7Goals
A for Awesome
Amazon Essentials
Arabella
Buttoned Down
Cable Stitch
Camp Moonlight
Clifton Heritage
Coastal Blue
Comfort Denim Outfitters
Core 10
Crafted Collar
Daily Ritual
Denim Bloom
Emma Riley
Essentialist
Good Brief
Goodsport
Goodthreads
Hale Denim
Haven Outerwear
Hayden Rose
Indigo Society
Isle Bay Linens
Kid Nation
Kold Feet
Lark & Ro
Leather Architect
Lily Parker
Madeline Kelly
Madison Denim
Mae
Mariella Bella
Mint Lilac
Moon and Back
Ocean Blues
Painted Heart
Paris Sunday
Peak Velocity
Plumberry
Quality Durables Co.
Rebel Canyon
Rugged Mile Denim
Savoir Faire
Scout + Ro
Signature Society
Smitten
Social Graces
SomethingForEveryone
Spotted Zebra
Stocking Fox
Suite Alice
The Fix
The Lovely Tote Co.
The Luna Coalition
The Plus Project
The Slumber Project
TheCambridgeCollection
Trailside Supply Co.
True Angel
Ugly Fair Isle
Velvet Rope
Wild Meadow
Wood Paper Company
 

Cross-Category

AmazonBasics
 

Grocery

Happy Belly
Wickedly Prime
 

Health & Household

Amazon Elements
Mama Bear
Presto
 

Home & Kitchen

Pinzon
Rivet
Stone & Beam

There’s a clear push from Amazon toward apparel. In addition to owning about 65 clothing and accessories brands, Amazon has introduced initiatives like Prime Wardrobe in an attempt to normalize e-commerce clothes shopping, heavily promoting their private label brands. CPG (consumer packaged goods) products aren’t far behind.

In order to keep up, established brands need to have a dedicated Amazon strategy, taking control of their content, customer experience, and digital marketing efforts as much as possible. To get ahead, brands need things that private labels don’t have — a superior brand story, an outstanding product, and a dedicated customer base.

This article is part of a series of daily posts called Quick Bites.

For more insight on Amazon, apparel, and private labels, read How Apparel Brands Can Succeed on Amazon or Amazon Pushes “Our Brands” in Apparel.